John Marin: A Retrospective Exhibition

John Marin: A Retrospective Exhibition

John Marin: A Retrospective Exhibition

John Marin: A Retrospective Exhibition

Excerpt

Ten years have passed since John Marin was last honored by an important retrospective exhibition. In 1936, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, assembled a notable group of his watercolors and works in other media, according him initial recognition of this kind. In the interim, Marin has gained both in stature and reputation. Now 76, he is hailed as an American titan whose influence, particularly on younger painters, is probably unsurpassed in the art of our time and our country. At 76, and in tenuous health, he is painting with all the fire of relentless youth--in a year which has brought him great suffering through the loss of his beloved wife, of his greatest champion, Alfred Stieglitz, of his close colleague, Arthur Dove. And, marvellously, there is nothing in Marin's long career more dramatic, more vigorous, than these canvases on which the oil is hardly dry. At 76, Marin has great plans for the future. Now at last, he says, he knows what he wants to do in paint.

Year after year (1909-1946) Stieglitz withdrew from public sale those of Marin's works which, in his judgment, were the painter's best, holding them in reserve for Marin himself. This exhibition derives wholly from the material thus accumulated; it reveals, quite apart from any intrinsic brilliance, the stirring rhythm of prophecy and taste which has written indelibly into the record of American art the phenomenal contribution of the Marin-Stieglitz team.

The exhibition is a joint undertaking of the Phillips Memorial Gallery, The Walker Art Center, and the Institute of Modern Art. We welcome the privilege of bringing Marin to this wider public since he has never been seen in these dimensions outside of New York. The enlightened cooperation of Mr. Duncan Phillips and of Mr. Daniel S. Defenbacher has been warmly appreciated.

Grateful acknowledgment is made to Miss Georgia O'Keeffe, Mrs. Edith Halpert and Mr. Marin himself for their innumerable kindnesses and for arduous effort in the planning of this project. Special thanks are due the staff of the Downtown Gallery in this connection.

The Museum of Modern Art, through its Director of Exhibitions and Publications, Mr. Monroe Wheeler, has generously consented to the lavish use of material culled from the catalogue of its 1936 Marin exhibi-

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