Dewer Rides

Dewer Rides

Dewer Rides

Dewer Rides

Excerpt

The editors of Paper Books are sincerely striving to achieve in America something which is a commonplace in Europe. Go where you will--walk about the Odeon in Paris or travel in Finland, way into the hinterland and almost to the Arctic circle--and you will find in stalls, on news stands, and in the Metropolitan bookstores, great numbers of good books in paper bound editions, purchasable at reasonable cost, within the price range of the average person. In our effort to assist in making possible a similar state of affairs in America, the editors have been obliged to consider on its merits each manuscript which comes into our hands. We have all read this book and agree that it is abundantly worth reading by those who by their subscriptions have manifested confidence in our judgment.

The story is, to say the least, unconventionally written. It is just where one accustomed to romantic fiction would expect to find all the details of character development filled in that the author leaves most to the reader's imagination. To some, therefore, his swift conclusion may seem unconvincing. I confess that it did to me, but the power and sincerity of this book must also, I think, strike other readers as it has impressed the editors.

Across the pages of this narrative, through old Dartmoor, through the lives of the men and women portrayed, Dewer, the evil spirit of the earth, rides on to the end inevitable.

This is more than a biographical novel of the hero, Dick Brendon, farmer of Dartmoor. In a sense the real hero is the malevolent spirit of the wild countryside, symbolized in the mythical demon hunter, Dewer, who exists in a weird folk belief.

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