Borah of Idaho

Borah of Idaho

Borah of Idaho

Borah of Idaho

Excerpt

In February, 1934, the preparation of this biography was begun. The reluctance with which Senator Borah gave his consent to the project has been matched only by his generosity in giving the writer unrestricted access to his private correspondence. The only request the Senator made was that his life be written as it has been lived. The writer has attempted to follow the Senator's wishes, permitting the facts to speak for themselves, and refraining, as far as possible, from intruding his own opinions. To pass judgment smugly upon each act of a famous living public man may be as irritating to the reader as it is hazardous for the writer. Yet the writer has not hesitated to draw some conclusions.

Senator Borah has played a large part in many movements. Certain historical events have been briefly sketched in order to aid the reader in estimating the Senator's part in them, but the reader must find the economic, social, and political history of the United States in other volumes. It is obviously impossible because of the limits of space and, in the writer's opinion, inadvisable as a matter of technique to rewrite the history of such events as the League of Nations fight and the Washington Conference in this single volume on Senator Borah. There is less need for rewriting such history in a biography of Senator Borah than there is for doing so in the biography of a different type of man, because, in a sense, Borah of Idaho has always stood apart from the event. He has initiated some movements, he has popularized more, he has given color to many; but he has seldom been in the inner circle of organizers and promoters. His part has been that of molding and expressing public opinion. Whatever his part may have been in the secret manipulations which led to the rejection of the League by the Senate, his chief contribution, perhaps the most significant of all contributions, was in popularizing anti-League sentiment and making the adverse vote in the Senate politically expedient. He played an even more solitary part in the Washington Conference. Supported by a public opinion which he had aroused, he forced . . .

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