Population Growth and Socioeconomic Progress in Less Developed Countries: Determinants of Fertility Transition

Population Growth and Socioeconomic Progress in Less Developed Countries: Determinants of Fertility Transition

Population Growth and Socioeconomic Progress in Less Developed Countries: Determinants of Fertility Transition

Population Growth and Socioeconomic Progress in Less Developed Countries: Determinants of Fertility Transition

Synopsis

Review of Major Explanations of Fertility Transition Fertility Determinants in Developing Countries An Empirical Model of the Fertility Transition for Contemporary LDCs Extending the Model: Endogenizing Family Planning Program Effort Regression Diagnostics Realigning the Sample Analysis of Residuals An Eclectic Model of the Fertility Transition Conclusions Appendix A: Data Appendix B: Influence Diagnostics

Excerpt

Rapid population growth has impaired the socioeconomic progress of the developing nations over the past half-century. By the 1980s this view had essentially become a stylized fact of contemporary development--albeit with some dissent. More holistic and less contentious would be the position that socioeconomic progress and the fertility transition are synergistic.

The consensus that eventually emerged over the decades following World War II reflected a number of influences, including: the growing gaps in economic performance between the industrialized and developing nations; the exaggerated initial claims (and hopes) for family planning programs in reducing fertility-- claims which, by the early 1970s, had contributed to a degree of disillusionment with the early family planning efforts; the discord of the first international conference on population at Bucharest in 1974, and the widespread de facto acceptance of the complementarity of economic development and family planning programs that followed; and the threat to international financial stability posed by the growing debt problems of the developing nations in the early 1980s.

The consensus was formally challenged at the second international conference in 1984 in Mexico City, when the official U. S. delegation advanced the position that economic growth, specifically capitalism and Western "free-market" economics, provided the key to socioeconomic progress and reduced population pressures. The immediate policy implication of the U.S. position was a pullback in American support for international efforts in family planning.

For some time I have been interested in global development--particularly the progress of the less developed countries. For a number of years I have taught a course on the economics of population at Davidson College. My teaching and research have convinced me that, despite the substantial work on fertility determinants in developing economies and the several existing theories for the fertility . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.