Transnational Media and Third World Development: The Structure and Impact of Imperialism

Transnational Media and Third World Development: The Structure and Impact of Imperialism

Transnational Media and Third World Development: The Structure and Impact of Imperialism

Transnational Media and Third World Development: The Structure and Impact of Imperialism

Synopsis

Through a comparative analysis of Western and Third World media practices, Meyer examines the relationship between the understanding of the term "news" and two conflicting theories of communication and development. Based on an examination of economic, social, and cultural indicators in 24 less-developed countries, Meyer critically assesses charges relating to neocolonialist features of news and information management, as well as cultural imperialism and political unrest. The final chapter summarizes these empirical tests as they relate to stuctural communications theory.

Excerpt

This book tells a story of the New World Information Order (NWIO). It is the story of the origin, development, theoretical foundation, validity, and future prospects of a major international reform movement. To adequately tell the tale of the NWIO, however, requires that we attend to much more than just these areas. The tale of the NWIO is actually a story of many stories. The story of the NWIO is a story of communication, culture, and crises.

To tell the story of global communication is to discuss the topics of international news reporting, interstate information flows, communication in the service of national development, and the structure of international relations. To tell the story of contemporary transnational cultural trends requires a consideration of cultural exchanges between the North and the South, intercultural communication as a function of the advantages enjoyed by the North over the South, and, especially, the effects of Western forms of communication on the ways of life in non-Western societies. Telling a tale of the crises which helped to evoke the NWIO movement is to speak of crises at several levels. There is the "crisis in international news" and there is the "crisis nature of international news." There are even those who would argue that international news and information flows serve as a major source for many of the current crises in Third World politics (i.e., political instability in developing nations as a result of inputs of information coming from the West).

The research presented here sorts through this plethora of issues by starting from the NWIO platform itself, moving on to the doctrines which support these policies, and then evaluating the doctrines empirically to assess the advisability of NWIO recommendations. In my own personal journey through these matters, I have been aided by many people. I would . . .

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