Behind Closed Doors: Gender, Sexuality, and Touch in the Doctor/Patient Relationship

Behind Closed Doors: Gender, Sexuality, and Touch in the Doctor/Patient Relationship

Behind Closed Doors: Gender, Sexuality, and Touch in the Doctor/Patient Relationship

Behind Closed Doors: Gender, Sexuality, and Touch in the Doctor/Patient Relationship

Synopsis

An examination of the sexual aspect of doctor-patient relations. The authors' aim is to alert doctors to their own behaviors and attitudes, including ways in which they may inadvertently cause harm to their patients, and to provide doctors with new skills that will allow them to care for their patients more safely. They discuss sexual misconduct, a "patient protection protocol," and six factors for safe practice. Includes a list of recommendations for further reading on the subject. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Excerpt

What goes on behind closed doors in a doctor's office? All sorts of things--and most of them, certainly, occur for the good of the patient. But some of the things that go on in a doctor's office do the patient no good at all.

If we were not sexual beings, this book would not be necessary. But we are. Moreover, we live in a society that is obsessed with sex and sexuality, yet has very little understanding of how they affect men and women, doctors and patients. Clearly, there are doctors who knowingly hurt their patients, and we'll take a look at why they do so. It is my belief, however, that the vast majority of the harm done to patients is not intended.

Most doctors--indeed, most health-care professionals--have only good intentions. But good intentions are not enough. We must ask ourselves, do we know what effects our attitudes and our behaviors have on our patients? Most of us don't--and we need to find out. Understanding how our patients perceive us and how they experience our actions is the first step in a process that can enable us to go beyond good intentions, to good results.

This book's purpose is two-fold: to alert doctors to their own behaviors and attitudes, and to the ways in which they may inadvertently cause harm to their patients; and to provide doctors with new skills that will allow them to care for their patients more safely, with less risk to both doctor and patient.

In the pages ahead, we'll examine the power dynamics between doctor and patient; the elusive issue of patient consent; and the effect of gender, sexuality and touch on the doctor/patient relationship. We'll offer several exercises to help doctors explore their own attitudes toward these seldom-discussed topics.

We'll discuss the special concerns of caring for patients who have previously been abused, and for all patients, so that everyone will feel safe and properly cared for.

Finally, we'll present a blueprint for a multi-stage program of personal and . . .

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