Voting Rites: The Devolution of American Politics

Voting Rites: The Devolution of American Politics

Voting Rites: The Devolution of American Politics

Voting Rites: The Devolution of American Politics

Synopsis

Does it really matter if a voter decides to vote or, as a significant number of Americans do each election, not vote? Ron Hirschbein explores this issue and shows why enfranchisement cannot be understood unless it is placed in context and history. Clearly, the meaning of a vote depends upon the situation: a vote cast among the 400 of Athens or in the College of Cardinals has one significance; this is considerably different from pulling a lever every four years in a mass society of spectacles and commodities. Hirschbein also examines how voting was transformed from an expression of the political will of the Athenian polity into a sacred natural right-only to be turned to a ritual of mass society.
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