Diffusion Research in Rural Sociology: The Record and Prospects for the Future

Diffusion Research in Rural Sociology: The Record and Prospects for the Future

Diffusion Research in Rural Sociology: The Record and Prospects for the Future

Diffusion Research in Rural Sociology: The Record and Prospects for the Future

Synopsis

Fliegel overviews and summarizes research on the spread of innovations through rural populations. The volume begins with a look at the discovery of diffusion as a patterned process in the 1940s and examines the creation of the classical model to explain diffusion as a transfer of information. Fliegel then notes how the classical model changed to accommodate the particular socioeconomic condition when the model was applied to developing countries after 1945. He concludes by commenting on the revival of interest in diffusion research, the further development and refinement of the classical model, and the modern emphasis on conservation-oriented innovations rather than on innovations that enhance production.

Excerpt

The publication of this volume, Diffusion Research in Rural Sociology: the Record and Prospects for the Future, byFrederick Fliegel , brings to a conclusion the Fiftieth Anniversary Series of the Rural Sociological Society. When the society initiated this series and asked me to serve as editor, I never expected that from concept to. final publication of five volumes would take nearly eight years. Yet the Fiftieth Anniversary Series is one of which we can be proud, and this final volume represents the culmination of a research career that has been at the core of rural sociology for over half of its existence as a society. Dr. Frederick Fliegel, known as Fritz to friends and colleagues worldwide, completed this manuscript just prior to his untimely death. As editor I had read and commented on earlier versions and had solicited reviews from members of the rss before submitting the manuscript to Greenwood Press. Subsequent evaluation by Greenwood Press was extremely positive, but they included a number of editorial and substantive recommendations for improvements. Efforts to generate a final revision by colleagues were not successful, and Greenwood Press was growing concerned over the passage of time since the original completion.

The Rural Sociological Society, however, owes a debt of gratitude and appreciation to Dr. George Butler, acquisitions editor for the social and behavioral sciences at Greenwood Press, for he provided both a renewed commitment and stimulus to finish Fritz's volume in 1992.

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