The Soviet Economy and the Red Army, 1930-1945

The Soviet Economy and the Red Army, 1930-1945

The Soviet Economy and the Red Army, 1930-1945

The Soviet Economy and the Red Army, 1930-1945

Synopsis

This book describes the creation of a new economy in the Soviet Union from 1930 to 1945. The Red Army defeated the Germans in World War II with equipment produced by that economy and not with masses of untrained men as has been often argued. The Soviet weapons were produced in factories designed and built under the direction of American engineers in the 1930s. Also, the Weimar Republic played a part in the creation of the Red Army by providing aviation and tank training schools and technical assistance to the developing armaments industry. Dunn argues that if France had been invaded by the Allies in 1943 rather than in 1944, the post-war world would have been less advantageous to the Soviet Union.

Excerpt

The first volume in a series on World War II, Second Front Now 1943, published in 1981, presented the thesis that the second front was possible in 1943 in Europe and advisable from the Western point of view. Hitler Nemesis: The Red Army, 1930-1945, published in 1994, presented the thesis that the Soviets did not need, neither did Stalin want, a second front in 1943, at least in France. The Red Army had emerged as a powerful force by early 1943, adequately trained and led, capable of defeating the German Army.

The present study, The Soviet Economy and the Red Army, 1930-1945, explores the method employed to equip and supply the Red Army. Once victory was assured in 1943, there is reason to believe that Stalin deliberately sought more time to drive the Germans farther west so that the Soviet Union would be in control of central Europe at the end of the war. The underlying thesis of all three books is the refutation of the charges that Franklin D. Roosevelt and George C. Marshall were tools of the Communist conspiracy in advocating the opening of the second front in 1943 and supplying the Soviet Union with huge amounts of lend-lease material. Instead, both were concerned with the speedy defeat of Germany and with saving millions of lives as well as developing a stronger Western position at the end of the war.

The purpose of the military is to kill people and destroy property, either to protect a nation from another or to pursue its national self-interest. To accomplish these goals, an entire nation, to one degree or another, is involved . . .

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