Entrepreneurship and the Privatizing of Government

Entrepreneurship and the Privatizing of Government

Entrepreneurship and the Privatizing of Government

Entrepreneurship and the Privatizing of Government

Synopsis

"The chapters in this anthology combine discussion of two currently hot' topics in public administration--privatization and entrepreneurship. . . . Perhaps the most attractive aspect of this book is that it is not merely an unbridled emotional paean to privatization and entrepreneurship but an objective introduction to these issues. The editor selects an array of essays that address not only theory and practice but also the pragmatic issues and problems associated with implementing these new policy initiatives. This book would be a welcome addition to libraries wishing to remain current with the expanding literature on privatization and entrepreneurship." Choice

Excerpt

Perhaps the two "hottest" topics in the fields of government and economics are privatization and entrepreneurship. Both have been viewed as ways of shrinking the public sector and providing the necessary stimulus to keep the American economy on a path of steady and sustained growth in the decades to come. the interrelations between the two has often been assumed but rarely studied. the chapters in this volume are designed to remedy that deficiency.

The chapters combine both the theory and the practice of privatization. They indicate that privatization is not just good government policy in terms of reducing the tax burden on individuals while maintaining or even expanding the quality of government services; it is good economics, because privatization opens new opportunities for entrepreneurial innovation. All economies, whether in the United States, other developed nations, or the less developed world, would benefit from privatization of governmental functions. the entrepreneurial instinct is likewise universal. the private sector can respond and is responding given the opportunity to provide services previously purveyed by the state. Perhaps the best hope for sustained growth in the developed world and for breaking the cycle of poverty in the less developed world lies in unleashing the entrepreneurial talents of the people. Privatization is a major step in that process.

I extend my thanks to all who have made this book possible. This includes not only the authors but the Association of Private Enterprise Education, sponsor of the annual conferences where drafts of several of these chapters were presented. Earlier versions of some were printed in the APEE's Journal of Private Enterprise. Thanks also go to the Heartland Institute in Chicago . . .

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