The Human Dimension of Depression: A Practical Guide to Diagnosis, Understanding, and Treatment

The Human Dimension of Depression: A Practical Guide to Diagnosis, Understanding, and Treatment

The Human Dimension of Depression: A Practical Guide to Diagnosis, Understanding, and Treatment

The Human Dimension of Depression: A Practical Guide to Diagnosis, Understanding, and Treatment

Synopsis

This book describes the depressive in his or her natural habitat, studies the everyday problems that cause one's depression, and develops treatment approaches directed to the depressive's real-world plight. It explores the borderland between the sacred and the profane, the academic and the popular, the scientific but impractical and the practical but unscientific. It relies as much on common sense, anecdote, and individual insight as it does on case histories and psychological test protocols. The book is divided into four sections: description, cause, prevention, and treatment.

Excerpt

This book describes the depressive in his natural habitat, studies the everyday problems that cause his depression, and develops treatment approaches directed to his real-world plight. It explores the borderland between the sacred and profane, the academic and the popular, the scientific-but-impractical and the practical-but-unscientific, the academic/formal/inhuman and the underground/ informal/human, the disease and its metamorphoses to normality and to creativity. It relies as much on common sense, anecdote, and individual insight as on such accoutrements of formal science as case histories and psychological test protocol.

Coverage

The book is in four sections: diagnosis, cause, prevention, and treatment. the section on diagnosis presents the mental status abnormalities in depression, includes a differential diagnosis of "classic" depressive symptoms, indicates when so-called "classic" symptoms of another disorder are in fact depressive, lists the physical complaints that are the product of depression, discusses normal depression, and touches briefly on hypomania.

The section on cause recognizes that common things are common and rare things are rare, with real troubles common and chemical troubles rare. It suggests that people do not become depressed because they are "stressed," "suffer losses," "introject anger," or "have interpersonal problems"; instead they become depressed in simple English: because their boss threatens to fire them, their wife threatens to leave, their cat dies, or every night on the way home the conductor on the train tells them to move forward for their stop and refuses to . . .

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