Economic Justice in Africa: Adjustment and Sustainable Development

Economic Justice in Africa: Adjustment and Sustainable Development

Economic Justice in Africa: Adjustment and Sustainable Development

Economic Justice in Africa: Adjustment and Sustainable Development

Synopsis

Combines theory with empirical evidence and economic with political analysis to provide the most comprehensive multi-disciplinary coverage to date on IMF and World Bank adjustment programs in Africa.

Excerpt

This book is the second volume in a project by the Center on Rights Development (CORD) on structural adjustment programs (SAPs) that has been underway at the Graduate School of International Studies (GSIS), University of Denver, since 1989 as a result of our interest in the link between human rights and economic development. Some of the chapters were presented in a panel entitled "Adjustment and Rights in Africa" at the African Studies Association's Annual Meeting in St. Louis, Missouri, in November 1991. Other chapters-- those of Haider Khan and Karamo Sonko, Khan and Hitoshi Sogabe, Mthuli Ncube, Jean Thiesen, and Sonko--were solicited because of their authors' continuous research on SAP in African countries.

The subject is diverse; it addresses the issue of adjustment and its consequences and examines policy recommendations in the basic areas of democracy, personal security, education, health, environment, and agriculture. Thus it represents a departure from most earlier studies that do not take these interrelationships into account and hence suffer from a truly narrow macroeconomic analysis, without attention to the political, social, and human effects of adjustment.

Thanks are due to several agencies and individuals. The first of these is the Ford Foundation, which has provided fellows and substantial funding for CORD from its establishment in 1988. We would like to thank all CORD participants who have directly or indirectly aided this project by vigorous interest and debate. The African Studies Association provided a forum for initial presentations, and a former president of the ASA, Ann Seidman, was very helpful and supportive. The UN Economic Commission for Africa and the London School of Economics have provided support for the Thiesen and Ncube chapters, respectively. Officials at the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the United Nations Development Program have been most helpful with discussion and de-

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