Diversifying Historically Black Colleges and Universities: A New Higher Education Paradigm

Diversifying Historically Black Colleges and Universities: A New Higher Education Paradigm

Diversifying Historically Black Colleges and Universities: A New Higher Education Paradigm

Diversifying Historically Black Colleges and Universities: A New Higher Education Paradigm

Synopsis

If Black colleges and universities wish to survive in the competitive and economically stressed education environment of the 21st century, they would do well to respond to some of the pressures for reform that the general school structures are undergoing, in particular population diversification. Sims provides a model for diversification that presents four major steps in orderly progression: the removal of barriers for admission of nonblack students; the development of special programs of interest to the general student population; and the diversification of faculty and administration. Ways of restructuring historically Black colleges and universities to be more supportive of diverse student populations are also developed in this work.

Excerpt

An important concept to education at all levels is diversity. This concept has evolved over the past 25 years, beginning with the ethnic studies movements of the 1960s and 1970s. With this movement came the recognition that all students needed to learn to live in a diverse, ever-changing world. In order to achieve this goal, educational institutions actively sought and required information on various cultures to be included in their courses, books, instructional materials, and classroom lectures. While the success of this movement is now evident in many institutions, it was vigorously fought during its formative years by institutions wishing to maintain the status quo -- institutions whose prevailing instructional philosophy supported molding students to fit the stereotypic, culturally acceptable Anglo-Saxon society -- legal requirements essentially forced change and compliance. Thus, predominately white (segregated) institutions had to open their doors to the minority student and other cultures or else risk funding cuts and legal sanctions. Yet the majority of historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) have continued to maintain their segregated campuses not necessarily out of choice, but because of their inability to attract white minority . . .

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