Quantitative Models for Project Planning, Scheduling, and Control

Quantitative Models for Project Planning, Scheduling, and Control

Quantitative Models for Project Planning, Scheduling, and Control

Quantitative Models for Project Planning, Scheduling, and Control

Synopsis

In this book, Badiru presents quantitative models in practical formats for project planning, scheduling, and control. The book organizes quantitative topics that have been successfully used in business, management, production, and service operations into an integrated framework for project management. Numerous examples are used to clarify the techniques covered. The quantitative approach of the book is designed to complement the usual qualitative approach to project management.

Excerpt

Project management is the process of managing, allocating, and timing resources to achieve a given goal in an efficient and expedient manner. The objectives that constitute the specified goal may be in terms of time, costs, or technical results. A project can be quite simple or very complex. An example of a simple project is painting a small, vacant room. An example of a complex project is launching a space shuttle.

Project management techniques are used widely in many enterprises, including construction, banking, manufacturing, marketing, health care services, transportation, R&D, public services, and so on. The standard hierarchy of the elements of project consists of system, program, project, task, and activity.

System: A project system consists of interrelated elements organized for the purpose of achieving a common goal. The elements are expected to work synergistically together to generate a unified output that is greater than the sum of the individual outputs of the components.

Program: A program is a very large and prolonged undertaking. Typically, such project endeavors span several years. Programs are usually associated with particular systems, for example, a space exploration program within a national defense system.

Project: A project is a time-phased effort of much smaller scope and duration than a program. Programs are sometimes viewed as consisting of a set of projects, but practitioners often refer to both without distinction. Government projects are often . . .

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