Policework: The Need for a Noble Character

Policework: The Need for a Noble Character

Policework: The Need for a Noble Character

Policework: The Need for a Noble Character

Synopsis

A strong challenge against the present American system of law enforcement, this book contends that politics have prevented police from achieving their sworn mission. Although his analysis is based on established theory, the author uses his own research and experience as evidence of the failure of the criminal justice system. Police departments are revealed as examples of a bureaucracy that has lost sight of its purpose and only seeks to survive. This work will be of interest to those seeking a different and controversial view of criminal justice, police science, public administration, urban studies, and political science programs.

Excerpt

Entering the field of policework is akin to entering matrimony or parenthood. It serves to define one's identity and is a life choice producing psychological and emotional bonds rivaling those found within the family. It is the vocation of the proverbial artist, and leaving it is painful to the soul. But there are some things that one simply must face: the death of one's parents, the inevitability of old age, the rejection of a lost love, and the limitations of one's intellect or athleticism. So it was with my career-it was at an end. It had run its course.

It makes no sense that a man's proudest achievements would lead to his own disillusionment without the understanding that it was all for naught-hollow victories and perversions of the charge of justice. I had witnessed the murder of my ideals in my own lifetime, and we have all been robbed of justice for the sake of an unholy ruse. Jeffrey Reiman puts it the best when he notes that the American criminal justice system is like a "carnival mirror," serving to distort the image of the society it is designed to protect. We peer into the laws of our government and into the activity of our police, searching for an accurate reflection of the condition of our times. Instead, we are presented with a reality that is refracted through the vested interests of those in power, a truth distorted by far too many of the politcal appointees who head our police departments.

I know what it is like to race through the night in pursuit of a gunman who only minutes before shot another human being in the street. and I know the horror of an all too abrupt an end to that chase, with flames rising out of the engine compartment of my sqaud car, my partner's skull smashed by a broken window strut. I have watched men die the most violent of deaths, and I have been forced to fight for my own life. All of this and more have I experienced in my career as a peace officer, and I might still be doing it today if I thought it made sense. But it does not.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.