International Handbook on Race and Race Relations

International Handbook on Race and Race Relations

International Handbook on Race and Race Relations

International Handbook on Race and Race Relations

Synopsis

Tables Preface Introduction Australia by Henry Albinski Brazil by Anai Dzidzienyo Canada by Doug Daniels Fiji by Ralph Premdas France by Alan B. Anderson India by Raj S. Gandhi Japan by Yung-Hwan Jo Malaysia by C.E.R. Abraham Netherlands by Joed H. Elich New Zealand by Andrew D. Trlin and Paul Spoonley Singapore by John Clammer South Africa by Paul Rich Sudan by Ann Lesch Switzerland by Carol Schmid Thailand by Suchitra Punyaratabandhu-Bhakdi and Juree Vichit-Vadakdan Trinadad by Stephen D. Glazier Union of Soviet Socialist Republics by Samuel P. Oliner United Kingdom by Barrie Axford United States by Jay A. Sigler West Germany by Lutz Holzner Bibliographical Note Appendix: Racial/Ethnic Divisions Index About the Contributors

Excerpt

The chapters that appear in this book were selected mostly on the basis of the expertise of the authors, all of whom have done recent and penetrating studies on race relations in important areas of the world. The nations chosen for study present some sort of geographic balance, but other factors also entered into the choice. Nations such as South Africa, the United States, Brazil, and Trinidad were chosen for obvious reasons, whereas Australia and New Zealand were picked because they are developing some progressive policies in the field of race relations. In the United Kingdom and the Netherlands the subject of race relations has just emerged on the public agenda. France, West Germany, Japan, and Switzerland may be viewed as unusual choices in view of their small racial minorities, but the evidence shows that race relations problems are emerging in those nations. It is hoped that the global treatment of the subject presented here will provide a rounded view of race and race relations all over the world.

Each contributor to this volume was given a common format and, to the extent that national conditions allowed, each adhered to that format. The result is a sharply focused treatment of a subject which, for all its importance, has been treated with some timidity in the academic community. I hope that this book will provide a useful source for further work in this subject area.

The contributions presented here are more descriptive than prescriptive, tending to describe, as closely as possible, what has actually been happening in race relations. Perhaps many other social scientists, determined to unearth some clues as to why race consciousness or race attitudes have emerged, would prefer to dwell on issues of causation. But here is a genuine need to describe the conditions in many of the world's societies objectively and factually without becoming overly involved in . . .

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