Entrepreneurship Education: Current Developments, Future Directions

Entrepreneurship Education: Current Developments, Future Directions

Entrepreneurship Education: Current Developments, Future Directions

Entrepreneurship Education: Current Developments, Future Directions

Synopsis

This volume surveys and reports on the latest developments in entrepreneurship education at the university, secondary, and elementary levels. The contributors explore what works and what doesn't, suggest ways to improve current programs, and propose solutions for areas not adequately covered by existing programs. They issue a call to educators nationwide to recognize the unique characteristics and contributions of entrepreneurs and to reorganize their courses and programs to accommodate, cultivate, and perpetuate the process of entrepreneurship throughout the educational system.

Excerpt

This book has a modest objective of setting forth what we do and do not know about how to educate entrepreneurs. It collects the best thoughts of many of the nation's experts in the area of economics and entrepreneurship education. Those who wrote these chapters share a common commitment to increased understanding of the American economy and the essential role the entrepreneur performs in that economy.

Many of the chapters in this book began as papers presented at the "Entrepreneurship/Economics/Education (E3)" conference at Widener University in March 1988. This conference was sponsored by the Joint Council on Economic Education under a grant from the J. Howard Pew Freedom Trust of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The purpose of that conference was to gather the ideas of those individuals who had worked for years providing entrepreneurship and economics education to the elementary and secondary school students of this nation. It was a preparatory step in the development of the E3 project for the Philadelphia public schools. That project, which is described later in this book, was an attempt to use entrepreneurship as a method of reaching economically disadvantaged students by providing them with the skills, attitudes, and insights they need to succeed not only as entrepreneurs but as productive citizens as well.

To that core, other chapters were added to fill the gaps. Several chapters began as papers presented at the Towbes Foundation conference in Santa Barbara, California, in August 1988. Entitled "Economic Education in the . . .

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