Technological Competition in Global Industries: Marketing and Planning Strategies for American Industry

Technological Competition in Global Industries: Marketing and Planning Strategies for American Industry

Technological Competition in Global Industries: Marketing and Planning Strategies for American Industry

Technological Competition in Global Industries: Marketing and Planning Strategies for American Industry

Synopsis

This book deals with the important question of how Japanese firms were able to dominate integrated circuit technology, a crucial technology that had been invented and pioneered in the United States. Based on interviews with Japanese CEOs and government officials, Methe finds the answer in the subtle balance of competitive and cooperative forces that exist in Japanese industry and government-sponsored research. The larger relationship between technological innovations, a firm's strategic approach to technology, and public policy, are explored, and the implications for U.S. firms are fully assessed with respect to planning effective international strategies.

Excerpt

A combination of record trade deficits, slumping productivity, and increasing awareness of the innovative capabilities of our economic partners has fueled concern over the international competitiveness of industry in the United States. Widespread debate has arisen about the causes of and remedies for these trends. the focus of this book is upon the interaction between the diffusion of technological innovations, firm strategy, and public policy. the central thesis is that there are reciprocal relationships between the characteristics of technological innovations, a firm's strategic approach to technology, and public policy. Technology, the firm's technology strategy, and public policy are linked to one another through their influence on the informational and financial resources needed for innovation.

Four research lessons are derived from previous work on the technology- strategy-environment interaction. These lessons are reviewed in the context of the Japanese and U.S. dram integrated circuit industries. Information on these industries and the firms' strategies and public policies has been gathered through interviews with key people in the Japanese and U.S. governments and industries. This information is used to provide insights into the lessons.

The central thesis is supported: reciprocal relationships exist between technological innovations, firm technology strategy, and public policy. the four research lessons also receive support. Technological innovations in the dram industry are shown to develop along defined paths, called technology innovation envelopes. To progress along these innovation envelopes requires more informational and financial resources in order to maintain the innovation process. This innovation imperative alters the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.