Empirical Knowledge on World Politics: A Summary of Quantitative Research, 1970-1991

Empirical Knowledge on World Politics: A Summary of Quantitative Research, 1970-1991

Empirical Knowledge on World Politics: A Summary of Quantitative Research, 1970-1991

Empirical Knowledge on World Politics: A Summary of Quantitative Research, 1970-1991

Synopsis

This research guide provides a comprehensive summary of all quantitative research in the World Politics field published in scholarly journals between 1970 and 1991. Each such article is summarized in terms of the central query or hypotheses, the spatial-temporal domain, the measurement of the predictor and outcome variables, the data analysis, and the findings. Article summaries are arranged alphabetically by first author. This guide contains three extensive indexes. The first references articles according to the topic(s) covered; the second according to the states, dyads, and other entities used as units-of-analyses in the study; the third according to the authors of the research. Graduate students, scholars, and practitioners will find this book an invaluable overview of the quantitative research that has been conducted on World Politics over the past two decades.

Excerpt

In these article summaries many words are either italicized or placed within quotation marks. We italicize concepts that we believe to be potentially ambiguous (i.e., systemic tightness), that are used as either an outcome or a predictor variable in the particular study, and that are operationally defined in the Data Operations section of the article summary. We use quotation marks to identify potentially ambiguous terms (i.e., "militarized interstate disputes", "activated" states) that are not used as predictor or outcome variables in the study.

In the Variable section of these article summaries we list the label used by the author(s) of the study to identify their predictor or outcome variables. The labels are in parentheses after our description of their variables, For example, in the first article summary, Altfeld and Bueno de Mesquita used the acronym CHOICE to identify their outcome variable in their data tables. Finally note that in the Findings section of each article summary we have listed the tables, or figures, where the data can be found that supports our description of the research findings. For example, in the findings section of the first article summary we write that "A very high percentage (between 98% and 85% correct) of the third parties' decisions to intervene or not, and which combatant to fight with, were accurately predicted using the probit choice model specified in equation 8 [Tables 1b, 1a]. . . ."

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