A Conceptual Approach to Management

A Conceptual Approach to Management

A Conceptual Approach to Management

A Conceptual Approach to Management

Synopsis

"Amey introduces key ideas and concepts he believes need to be understood by those entering the study of management. Rather than following the functional approach used in most introductory texts. Amey opts for a conceptual presentation. The book consists of a series of essays addressing topics such as systems, objectives, information, organizational structure, types of interdependence, value and cost, risk and uncertainty, control and performance, motivation, measurements, and causation and explanation. The book was written primarily for beginning MBA students and secondarily for students seeking various business-related professional degrees that require courses in management. At the MBA level the book is an appropriate introduction to management, especially for students from disciplines remote to business." - Choice

Excerpt

The purpose of this book is to provide those entering the study of management with an introduction to the key ideas or concepts that need to be understood in pursuing this endeavor. Some caveats should, however, be stated immediately. First, while some of the concepts are universally applicable to the management of all types of organizations, the book has been written more particularly with business organizations in view, especially private business organizations. Second, the intention has not been to list all the concepts that have been found to be useful in studying business organizations but rather to be parsimonious, selecting the minimal set of key ideas underlying the various aspects of management. the resulting set of concepts, it is hoped, constitutes a basic methodology of management at the time of writing.

The book was written primarily for beginning Master of Business Administration (MBA) students in university business schools, and secondarily for students seeking various business-related professional qualifications (such as accounting, banking) that require courses in management. To all of these the following justification of the approach taken in this book is offered. First, existing books on management, often titled Principles of Management, invariably take a functional approach. They describe the various functions that managers perform: planning, organizing, staffing, directing, motivating, controlling, decision-making, and measuring performance. in these usually lengthy descriptions (500 to 800 pages) of what management consists of the treatment of conceptual ideas is superficial and incomplete. Business management is both an art and a science; there are elements of both. in many areas of business, however, relatively few large enterprises command a disproportionately large share of trade, and in these large enterprises management is collective, impersonal, and more dependent on applied science in most of its functions. This tendency has received reinforcement from the increasing maturity of management as an academic discipline. in the past quarter-century or so, the pace of new developments in management science, statistics, finance, and accounting, originating in the business schools, has considerably quickened.

The second reason why a book taking a conceptual rather than a functional approach to management is needed is that, as a career opportunity, management has a very wide catchment area--just as many of those occupying senior management positions in large corporations are engineers, accountants, and scientists by training, so the composition of a beginning mba class in many universities is likely to include more . . .

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