Personalities and Products: A Historical Perspective on Advertising in America

Personalities and Products: A Historical Perspective on Advertising in America

Personalities and Products: A Historical Perspective on Advertising in America

Personalities and Products: A Historical Perspective on Advertising in America

Synopsis

Profiling such luminaries as P. T. Barnum, John Wanamaker, and Harley Procter, this book examines the contributions that several prominent individuals have made to advertising in America. The work opens with a discussion of Colonial advertising and the printers who created it and then turns to early advertising agents, such as Francis Wayland Ayer. The great promoter P. T. Barnum's contributions are considered, as is John Wanamaker's impact on retail advertising. The book then examines the advertising style of Albert Lasker, owner of the Lord and Thomas advertising agency, as well as Procter & Gamble and the advertising of "Ivory soap." Elliot White Springs's use of sex in advertising and the Spring's Cotton Mills advertising campaign of the 1940s and 1950s concludes the volume.

Excerpt

This book is about certain individuals who, in some instances, not only made considerable fortunes in their lifetimes but contributed greatly to advertising.

In Chapter 1, printers who published newspapers and magazines in the American colonies are discussed. The discussion primarily concerns the differences between the printers, their respective newspapers or magazines, and, of course, the advertisements that they accepted for publication.

Chapter 2 examines the first major advertising agents, specifically Volney B. Palmer, George P. Rowell, and Francis Wayland Ayer, and their contributions to advertising as a profession.

Chapter 3 concerns P. T. Barnum's life and his contributions to advertising and marketing. Part of this chapter was presented in 1993 in different form at the Popular Culture Association's National Convention, which was held in New Orleans.

Chapter 4 discusses Lydia Pinkham, the advertising of her controversial but supposedly effective vegetable compound, and the journalistic campaign against the patent medicine industry by certain muckrakers.

Chapter 5 examines John Wanamaker, who was responsible for one of the largest retail stores of his day. Wanamaker's success was due partly to his ability to create effective advertisements and innovative forms of promotion.

Chapter 6 focuses on Albert Lasker and the Lord and Thomas . . .

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