Home of the Brave, a Play

Home of the Brave, a Play

Home of the Brave, a Play

Home of the Brave, a Play

Excerpt

A self-appointed prophet is always without honor along Broadway. Yet I insist that young Arthur Laurents will be the most important dramatist to come directly from the war theatre to the theatre of curtains and footlights. He has brought something from the battle areas that the more commercially successful young dramatists have failed to acquire. His is a first attempt in play-making that is tightly written, stage-wise in construction, and, most noteworthy of all, deeply moving.

Home of the Brave is an honest play by an honest playwright on an honest theme. Arthur Laurents, American, and now a G.I. out of uniform, walks right up and faces the predicament of a lad who is a soldier and a Jew, but above all is a human being, sensitive to the shock of prejudice. I am convinced that Coney's position in or out of Home of the Brave is none too comfortable, that the Coneys of the whole world respond as Arthur Laurents has made his Coney respond to the prejudices around him. His is more than a soldier's problem; it is the problem of people everywhere.

At the Belasco Theatre, Home of the Brave had a fine cast, a fine director and a fine production. Actors Kendall Clark, Russell Hardie, Henry Barnard, Alan Baxter, and, more than their fellows, Eduard Franz and Joseph Pevney; director Michael Gordon; designer Ralph Alswang, and co-producers Lee Sabinson and William Katzell gave it their all.

But Arthur Laurents' play shone through the lot of them. Up there on a mid-Manhattan platform, down here between . . .

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