Philosophy of Education

Philosophy of Education

Philosophy of Education

Philosophy of Education

Synopsis

"An outstanding contribution.... This is the best overview of the field available today." Nicholas Burbules Editor, Educational Quarterly

Excerpt

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION is the philosophical study of education and its problems. Unlike other branches of philosophy, it is rarely taught in philosophy departments. Just as philosophy of law or medicine is often taught (if it is taught at all) in law or medical school, philosophy of education is usually taught in schools or departments of education. Its central subject matter is education, and its methods are those of philosophy.

Traditionally, philosophical methods have consisted of analysis and clarification of concepts, arguments, theories, and language. Philosophers, as philosophers, have not usually created theories of education (or teaching, learning, and the like); instead, they have analyzed theories and arguments--sometimes enhancing previous arguments, sometimes raising powerful objections that lead to the revision or abandonment of theories and lines of arguments. However, there are many exceptions to this view of philosophy as analysis and clarification. The classical Greek philosophers, for example, construed philosophy much more broadly and explored a host of questions that later philosophers--more narrowly analytic in their outlook--rejected as outside the scope of philosophy. Indeed, for the Greeks, "philosophy" meant "love of wisdom," and today we think of their discussions as part of an "immortal conversation." Many of us believe that philosophy went too far in rejecting the eternal questions, and there are signs that philosophers may once again invite their students to join in the immortal conversation.

Despite the dominant analytical view of twentieth-century philosophy, philosophers have sometimes created theories, and today many philosophers engage in constructive work. They introduce new language and suggest powerful alternatives to the standard uses of language. Some now even draw heavily on literature and empirical data in the form of teaching-narratives to make points that cannot be made in the traditional . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.