Teen Legal Rights

Teen Legal Rights

Teen Legal Rights

Teen Legal Rights

Synopsis

A must-have for those who own the first edition, this revised and updated edition, provides teenagers with the most current answers to their legal questions. The user-friendly question and answer format, familiar to users of the first edition, gives teenagers important and relevant information on a variety of topics of interest to them including driving a car, parental authority, school authority, sexual issues, and many more. New material not only expands on topics covered in the first volume to reflect new legislation, but also includes hot new topics such as legal issues involved with Internet use and the legality of teaching creation science in school.

Excerpt

The purpose of Teen Legal Rights: Revised Edition is again to educate teens, parents, teachers, and counselors about the legal rights of young people and to explain the many aspects of American law that teens want to know more about. Like its 1994 predecessor, Teen Legal Rights: A Guide for the '90s, the revision is in question-and-answer format.

As a practical matter, minors in America had no legal rights when the twentieth century dawned. They were regarded as little more than "property." Children in the upper and middle classes were usually healthy and safe. But if a child's parents were poor, the child might be a wage-earner, grossly overworked and grossly underpaid, by the age of eight. If a youngster's parents were cruel and abusive (whether poor or not), the child undoubtedly suffered both emotionally and physically and suffered in private. In the early 1900s, countless immigrant children worked in mills and mines. Orphanages and care homes warehoused abandoned, abused, and needy youths, and often these institutions treated their charges with great cruelty.

As America began to discuss and document these injustices, and as the rights of both workers and women expanded, young people came to be perceived as more than a property interest. By 1910 this perception gave rise to the idea that children should be protected and that governments should play a role in child protection efforts. As a result, Americans began to regard even the poorest child differently (except that White America continued to consider children of color to be young barbarians). Settlement houses appeared in most U.S. cities. However, the . . .

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