Organizational Change and Drug-Free Workplaces: Templates for Success

Organizational Change and Drug-Free Workplaces: Templates for Success

Organizational Change and Drug-Free Workplaces: Templates for Success

Organizational Change and Drug-Free Workplaces: Templates for Success

Synopsis

The organizational change approach that is required to achieve drug-free workplaces is the main subject of this book. Based upon findings from a three-year national research study, Backer and O'Hara examine what has already been done to combat drug abuse in the workplace. They place the results of their inquiry within the larger context of organizational change theory. The critical secondary issues of responses to AIDS in the workplace and containing employer health care costs through managed care are also addressed.

Excerpt

This book examines a number of key health issues threatening the productivity of our workforces and Drs. Backer and O'Hara provide keen insights on how and why employer responses succeed or fail. From ceo on down to first-line managers, effectively managing change processes requires commitment to longer-term strategies and attacking the causes of problems rather than focusing on "quick-fixes." This book explores this management challenge and is especially of value for human resource and employee assistance professionals who routinely address the challenges described within their day-to-day work world. Through theory and case studies, the authors provide a rich overview on how organizations work best to meet the challenges in the nineties or fail to do so at their own peril and future competitiveness.

In the last several years, the problem of drug abuse in the workplace has led to many companies developing a wide range of responses with varying success. This book provides many examples of why single-solution, "quick-fix" approaches to this complex problem are doomed to fail. Drs. Backer and O'Hara describe how those responsible for addressing the problem may inadvertently be blinded by corporate culture and management practices and "shoot themselves in the foot" as they adopt a strategy based on another company's experience that does not quite fit their situation. They also note how some organizations trumpet their success in their war on drugs, while ignoring the greater problem of alcohol abuse in the workplace, which is often rationalized because "alcohol is legal." Most significantly, they underscore a key shortcoming many employers . . .

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