The Social Limits of Art

The Social Limits of Art

The Social Limits of Art

The Social Limits of Art

Excerpt

It is perhaps more appropriate to call this a postcomment rather than an introduction because it is written after I put down all that seemed straight in the path.

I must first note what I have omitted. The original outline included a section on those art forms whose existence depends more on the demands of a market than on the impulses of the artist. Many things prevented me from completing that section and the most important lie within me. I find it difficult to empathize with the tastes of that market and my bias often shows. The work to which I was taught to respond has never been popular with many people. My tastes run to the products of the studio, the conservatory, and the ivory tower. I am not to the manor born in my preferences, but the network in which my early life was spent was one in which there was a lively concern for the matters that follow. The kinsmen, friends, and teachers of my youth thought that certain books and paintings were especially good and that a "cultured" person was supposed to know something about them. Moreover, my teachers were not about to defer to the opinions of any young student, and it was perilous to reject what they considered best, although sometimes I thought their examples bad, and for the most part I still do. They did, however, force me to understand externally defined standards. Perforce I had to go to the art museums and the concert halls, but not to the movies, swing bands, and, most unfortunately, the ethnological collections. It is only in recent years that I have tried to separate the wheat from the chaff among these other genre. I also can claim some training as an artist as a background for the present effort. I studied to be a sculptor until I was eighteen; I then . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.