Hitler's Nemesis: The Red Army, 1930-1945

Hitler's Nemesis: The Red Army, 1930-1945

Hitler's Nemesis: The Red Army, 1930-1945

Hitler's Nemesis: The Red Army, 1930-1945

Synopsis

This book traces the development of the Russian Army in reaction to the rise of Hitler. Caught by surprise in 1941, the Red Army had achieved superiority over the Germans by 1943, and had no real need for Western military assistance. The Russians, as this book establishes, won because they had better organization and equipment--i.e., a better and more effective army. By delaying the second front, the Allies gave Stalin the opportunity to enslave Eastern Europe.

Excerpt

Fifty years have passed since the end of the Second World War, a conflict whose scope, ferocity, destructiveness, and consequences were unprecedented. Quite naturally, much has been written about the war. It has been analyzed repeatedly from the political, social, economic, and military perspectives. Guilt has been assessed and reassessed by historians and political scientists alike. Civilian and military participants have explained in their memoirs how and why they acted as they did. Biographies have laid bare the mind and soul of military leaders and dissected their feats and failures, and many novelists have tried to capture the challenges and horror of war from a human perspective. All but a few have failed.

Much has been written, as well, about the purely military realm. Campaigns and battles, leaders and the led, and military organizations from army to platoon have received their due. Yet, after all these years of close investigation and the publication of hundreds of volumes, both good and bad, two yawning gaps in our knowledge of the war remain to be filled. The first, analysis of the military science or art of war, or what makes forces function as they do, is quite natural and understandable. The victorious Western powers were democracies, and democracies classically are prone to forget conflicts once they have ended. Nor, by their very nature, do they dwell on the intricacies of war while at peace, for military establishments in democracies rapidly demobilize and attention shifts to postwar reconstruction. The other victorious . . .

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