The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography - Vol. 5

The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography - Vol. 5

The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography - Vol. 5

The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography - Vol. 5

Excerpt

Mary Gaffney

Mary Gaffney was born in Selville, Miss., in 1846 and brought to Texas in 1860. She settled in the western part of Madison County and has been there ever since. My father was owned by Jessie Wilson and Mother's name Mary Gaffney now. I had one sister name, Sue. There was only the two of us and Sue was nearly grown when I was born so I did not play with her so much. I heard them say I had grandparents, but I never did see or hear much of them as they would not let us think much about our people then because if we did it would be hard to trade us off.

Now I gets a small pension from the Government and the little jobs I gets to do for the white folks I does pretty well.

I was born in Selville, Mississippi in the year of 1846 and brought to Texas in 1860. We settled in the western part of Madison County and been there ever since. My father was owned by another man, his name was Jessie Wilson. Mother's name, May Gaffney now. I had one sister name, Sue. After we came to Texas mother was put with another man named Joe Gaffney.

Our home life we did not know very much about as being only two of us kids and Sue was nearly grown before I came along so I never did play with her so much.

Since I could remember Mistress had me bringing in wood and doing jobs like that around the house. Our quarters were good, it was built out of hides put together with poles. It was always dry inside and our beds were on the ground in one corner of the room. There was six of us negroes to the room. Our beds were made out of grass, shucks and few cotton seed scattered over that, and we could get close together and crawl under that straw and keep real warm and dry all the year round. Of course that was not much protection from wild animals like we had here then, but that was what Maser built for us to stay in and that is where we had to stay. After Maser sold out and came to Texas we had log quarters built different, and we had the same kind of beds, but here Maser locked us in at night cause there was lots of Indians then and they would scalp everyone they could find. We were afraid to go very far from our quarters unless Maser was with us.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.