Beyond Multiple Choice: Evaluating Alternatives to Traditional Testing for Selection

Beyond Multiple Choice: Evaluating Alternatives to Traditional Testing for Selection

Beyond Multiple Choice: Evaluating Alternatives to Traditional Testing for Selection

Beyond Multiple Choice: Evaluating Alternatives to Traditional Testing for Selection

Synopsis

This volume provides in-depth coverage of a key piece of today's human resource selection technology--the viability of alternatives to paper and pencil multiple-choice selection tests. Each chapter of this edited volume presents an intensive examination of a key "alternative to multiple-choice testing." The content of the book's chapters ranges from reviews of issues associated with, and evidence available for, the use of particular selection text alternatives (computerized testing, performance assessments) to empirical investigation of other alternatives (biodata, creative skills); from examination of standards for choosing among selection tests to practitioners' and test takers' perspectives. This book is important for researchers and practitioners in the human resource selection field who have wanted a resource that provides a comprehensive examination of multiple-choice selection testing and its alternatives.

Excerpt

Selection testing today has become identified in the public eye as "traditional testing" -- paper-and-pencil multiple-choice ability tests. Surely there must be something better. There is also a high tide of concern about testing in the schools, with calls for reform reverberating in Congress, state legislatures, business circles, and parent-teacher associations around the country. Can't we do better as a nation?

These testing problems, evident in the early 1990s, set the stage for a conference held at Maumee Bay State Park, Ohio, in October 1994. For decades researchers have been investigating the measurement and prediction of individual differences in performance. the conference was held to take stock of the state of the art in selection testing, specifically to see what progress had been made on some perennial problems and to speculate about prospects for useful, new initiatives.

Robert Guion, Mary Tenopyr, David Kleinke, and Ann Marie Ryan joined me on the conference planning committee. We sought to bring together participants who could address the many diverse domains of selection-testing research and practice and who would do so without hype or partisanship. We wanted to cover both human resources and educational research and sought scholarly and critical appraisals supported by research evidence. the chapters in this volume are based on several papers presented at the conference. in some cases these chapters include substantial amounts of added detail and context beyond that delivered at the conference.

Support for the conference came from the Ohio Board of Regents' Eminent Scholar and Academic Challenge grants and from the Institute for Psychological Research and Application. the bgsu Psychology Foundation gave additional funding and will receive all royalties this book earns. I thank Lisa Friedel for her helping to organize the conference and Karen Ury for helping to prepare the indexes for this volume.

--Milton D. Hakel . . .

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