Paul and the Torah

Paul and the Torah

Paul and the Torah

Paul and the Torah

Synopsis

While the task of exegesis after Auschwitz has been to expose the anti-Judaism inherent in the Christian tradition, the founding of the Jewish state has also helped show the continuation of the covenant between God and Israel. For Lloyd Gaston, the living reality of Judaism makes possible a better understanding of Paul's prophetic call as Apostle to the Gentiles. In Paul and the Torah, Gaston argues that the terms of Paul's mission must be taken seriously and that it is totally inappropriate to regard his 'conversion' as a transition from one religion to another. Paul's congregations were not made up of Christian Jews: they were exclusively Gentile. Thus he focused on God's promises to Abraham concerning Gentiles, which were fulfilled in the faithfulness of Jesus Christ.

Excerpt

Introductions come at the beginning because they help the reader set what follows into a wider context. They are usually written last because only at the end of the road can the author look back on the journey and see something of what that context has been. This introduction consists then of an inextricable mixture of what have been presuppositions for the following chapters and what are conclusions drawn from them. What will be presented here are not arguments meant to persuade the reader but only a description of the context to enable the reader to understand better why the following chapters argue in the way they do.

The essays contained in this book were written at various times and are presented here in chronological order. The first one had its origins in a paper presented to the first meeting of the Anti-Judaism Seminar of the Canadian Society of Biblical Studies in 1977. That seminar continued to be an important context for working out many of the subsequent studies. It has seemed advisable to let the essays stand in more or less unrevised form, in order that the reader might follow the progress of the research. Discoveries which are still only questions in one often become the subject of a fuller investigation in a subsequent one. If this procedure sometimes results in repetitions concerning method, they are repetitions which seem to be important to reiterate. In the author's mind, at any rate, the result is not a collection of essays on discrete and unrelated themes but a unity whose growth can still be traced.

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