Intervention: The Use of American Military Force in the Post-Cold War World

Intervention: The Use of American Military Force in the Post-Cold War World

Intervention: The Use of American Military Force in the Post-Cold War World

Intervention: The Use of American Military Force in the Post-Cold War World

Synopsis

This new edition of the Carnegie Endowment bestseller -- selected by Choice as "an outstanding academic book of 1995" -- now also discusses the interventions in Haiti and Bosnia, the 1998 crisis (and earlier skirmishes) with Iraq, and the decision to not intervene to halt apparent genocide in Central Africa. In the core original study, which draws upon twelve cases -- including Somalia, Lebanon, Panama, Grenada, and the Gulf War -- Richard Haass suggests political and military guidelines for potential U.S. military interventions ranging from peacekeeping and humanitarian operations to preventive strikes and all-out warfare.

Excerpt

In the waning days of the Bush Administration, I was assigned the task of drafting a speech for the President. The speech was to constitute his final major public statement on national security issues. The subject was military intervention.

It was an obvious choice for the address. As commander-in- chief, George Bush had ordered U.S. forces into harm's way on numerous occasions, most dramatically in the Persian Gulf War, but also in Panama, the Philippines, and Liberia. U.S. forces had just entered Somalia; at the same time, the Bush Administration decided against involving military forces in Bosnia. There was confusion -- why Somalia and not Bosnia? -- and a growing debate about the proper role for U.S. military forces in the obviously complex and dangerous world emerging in the wake of the Cold War and the break-up of the Soviet Union.

I will leave to others to judge whether the speech delivered by President Bush at West Point on January 5, 1993, added to the debate. I came away from that experience with mixed emotions -- pleased that we were able to articulate some serious views on an important and enduring public policy issue, frustrated that we had barely brushed the surface of an extraordinarily difficult and complex set of concerns.

Obviously, no speech could do justice to the subject of military intervention. I decided that I would return to it and attempt to produce a deeper and more comprehensive assessment. With time provided by the choices of the American voting public and the support of the Carnegie Endowment, I soon had the opportunity. This book is the result.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.