Friedrich A. Sorge's Labor Movement in the United States: A History of the American Working Class from 1890 to 1896

Friedrich A. Sorge's Labor Movement in the United States: A History of the American Working Class from 1890 to 1896

Friedrich A. Sorge's Labor Movement in the United States: A History of the American Working Class from 1890 to 1896

Friedrich A. Sorge's Labor Movement in the United States: A History of the American Working Class from 1890 to 1896

Synopsis

Introduction Buffalo Tennessee April 1893 Domestic Market--Financial Crisis of 1893--Silver and Tariff Legislation--Sugar and Tariff Legislation--Sugar Trust Judicial Power and Practice in the United States, 1894-1895 The Labor Movement, 1893 and 1894 The American Railway Union and the Pullman Strike The Investigation Committee--Postscript The Report of the Chicago Strike of June-July 1894 by the United States Strike Commission The Annual Convention of the Knights of Labor and the American Federation of Labor The Strike in Brooklyn and Other Events The Labor Protective Laws and the Law-Abiding Citizens of Illinois/Socialism The Labor Movement in 1895 The Presidential Election Strikes and the Progress of Social Party Index

Excerpt

In 1977, Greenwood Press published some of the articles whichFriedrich A. Sorge, the German-American Marxist, had written between 1891 and 1896 for Die Neue Zeit, the theoretical journal of the Social Democratic Party of Germany. These articles, collectively entitled The Labor Movement in the United States, covered the history of the American working class from colonial times until 1890. The translation of the German text had been arranged byAngela andBrewster Chamberlin, while a preface and an extensive biographical account of Sorge was provided by Philip S. Foner. Although Sorge had formally concluded his history of the American labor movement with the year 1890, he wrote enough additional material between 1892 and the end of the century to warrant a second volume.

A few years ago, I was asked to translate the second volume. Unfortunately, Foner wasn't able to write an introduction for this volume, as he had hoped he could, and I am reluctantly writing it myself in order to make the translation of Sorge's second volume available to an English-speaking audience. The translation should be made available because Sorge happened to be one of the pioneers of modern American socialism.

Friedrich Adolph Sorge (1828-1906) was born in Germany, in a small hamlet near Torgau on the Elbe River, where American and Soviet soldiers later joined forces at the end of World War II. His father was a liberal Protestant minister who provided his son Friedrich with a good education, particularly in the field of music. The year 1848 found the Sorges on the losing side of the revolution. Friedrich A. Sorge, as a matter of fact, fought in the ultimate engagement of the revolutionary forces in Baden (June 1849) alongside Friedrich Engels. Then came exile in Switzerland, Belgium, and England. Condemned to death in his native . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.