Nominating the President: The Politics of Convention Choice

Nominating the President: The Politics of Convention Choice

Nominating the President: The Politics of Convention Choice

Nominating the President: The Politics of Convention Choice

Excerpt

"The American President is the most powerful democratic official in the world."

So goes a common statement about American government. Citizens and foreigners alike have accepted the statement and find themselves engaged in the busy game of "President-watching." Catering to this interest, authors have written on topics as diverse as White House menus and the wartime powers of the Chief Executive.

Political analysis of the office, however, has been largely confined to the election rather than the nomination of Presidents. Much has been written about the conduct of campaigns, the issues involved in our national elections, and the behavior of the voters. Yet, the nomination of candidates for President is also of crucial importance. Through the national nominating process, the parties reduce the number of candidates from possibly scores to but two. The voter becomes deeply involved only after his realistic choice has been defined and drastically limited.

This being the case, it is surprising that so little . . .

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