The Charter of Connecticut, 1662

The Charter of Connecticut, 1662

The Charter of Connecticut, 1662

The Charter of Connecticut, 1662

Excerpt

A LETTERS patent under the great seal was a document of the highest importance and to obtain it was often a tedious and expensive process. The procedure was defined by an act of 1535 and remained essentially unaltered until the entire system of the seals was reorganized by acts passed in 1851 and 1884, greatly simplifying the process.

The events precedent to the issue of the charter are as follows. As soon as the news of the restoration of Charles II was received in the colony a hurried gathering was called by Governor Winthrop of such magistrates and deputies as could be assembled. These men agreed to recommend to the next General Court, that of March, 1661, the duty and necessity of dispatching a speedy address to "our Soveraigne Lord Charles," declaring that the inhabitants of the colony were "his Highness loyall and faythfull subjects" and asking for "the continuance and confirmation of such priviledges and liberties" as were necessary for "the comfortable and peaceable settlement" of the colony.

At the next court, that of May, a committee was appointed to perfect the address, which in the meantime had been drawn up by the governor, and to frame a petition for presentation "to his Matie," together with letters to such "noble personages" as might be thought favorable to the colony, such as the Earl of Manchester, Lord Saye and Sele, Lord Brooke, and others of the old . . .

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