The Real War of the Theaters: Shakespeare's Fellows in Rivalry with the Admiral's Men, 1594-1603; Repertories, Devices, and Types

The Real War of the Theaters: Shakespeare's Fellows in Rivalry with the Admiral's Men, 1594-1603; Repertories, Devices, and Types

The Real War of the Theaters: Shakespeare's Fellows in Rivalry with the Admiral's Men, 1594-1603; Repertories, Devices, and Types

The Real War of the Theaters: Shakespeare's Fellows in Rivalry with the Admiral's Men, 1594-1603; Repertories, Devices, and Types

Excerpt

I have attempted here a chronological survey of the theatrical events of Queen Elizabeth's last decade, the first study to take up systematically season by season those complex interrelationships among happenings in the nation and on the stage which so intensely concern us in studying the rivalry between Shakespeare's fellows and the other chief London company, the Admiral's men. I have considered each court season by itself in order to bring out the fluctuations of stage vogue and royal favor. The chronological method should make it possible for the reader to see with some clearness the differing literary policies of the companies and their causes in differences of patronage and audience. The most important patrons of dramatic companies, the Admiral, Worcester, and the two Hunsdons, as well as the two Cobhams for their relation to the drama through the Chamberlainship, are here for the first time traced through this crucial decade in their political and personal relationships to each other and to the dominant factions of Essex and the Cecils.

This is far too great a sweep of history to be treated definitively within the scope of this study; but I have tried to draw the outlines so that students hereafter may not have to generalize for the whole decade from some momentary arrangement of the shifting scene, or to apply to the interpretation of a play of 1600 political relationships assumed from those of 1596. I have ventured few generalizations about the censorship; but it appears more subject to partisan influences than has hitherto been assumed. The working out of the study has forced me to hazard some definition, not too dogmatic, I trust, of Shakespeare's politics-- not as the private citizen, whose opinions may always remain mysterious, but as the chief play-writing member of a close coöperative producing group which wore the livery of a place-holding noble.

My thanks are due to the Modern Language Association of America, which has made possible this publication, and to the members of its Monograph Committee for a painstaking consideration which was accompanied by many valuable marginal hints on the manuscript. The study was begun in a Yale doctoral dissertation in 1926; its present development was vastly aided by a Sterling Research Fellowship at Yale for 1930-31. I wish to express my gratitude also to the staffs of the Sterling Library at Yale, of the Peabody, Pratt, Goucher, and Johns Hopkins libraries in Baltimore, of the Widener Library at Harvard, and of the Duke University and University of North Carolina libraries for a great many favors; to my wife for untiring clerical assistance; to Professors . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.