Children's Development within Social Context: Research and Methodology - Vol. 2

Children's Development within Social Context: Research and Methodology - Vol. 2

Children's Development within Social Context: Research and Methodology - Vol. 2

Children's Development within Social Context: Research and Methodology - Vol. 2

Synopsis

These companion volumes bring together research and theoretical work that addresses the relations between social context and the development of children. They allow for the in-depth discussion of a number of vital metatheoretical, theoretical, and methodological issues that have emerged as a result of increased investigation in these areas. For example: Which methodological and statistical procedures are appropriate and applicable to studies of social context and processes of development? Should the nature of social context be reconceptualized as something more than different levels of some social independent variable? Are theories of development that do not consider social context incomplete? Will the increasingly finer definitions of social context lead to extreme situationism and contextualism? As developmental theory and investigation continues to address relationships between social and cognitive development, it becomes increasingly important that issues concerning social context be elaborated and discussed.

Excerpt

Contemporary psychology is somewhat exaggeratedly fixated upon the magical word "research." We all are involved in endless empirical investigations, worried about (mostly organizational) issues of data "collection" and "analysis," and evaluating our peers on the basis of their "research quality." And, of course, we never get tired of calling for "more data" (or "better planned studies").

This (admittedly somewhat schematic) description of the activities of present-day psychologists leads us to the focus of this (second) volume of our treatise on child development in its social context. In Volume 1, a variety of metatheoretical issues were covered, but no clearer link with the "research itself" emerged. In this volume, different contributors take many of these general concerns to the realm of "research"--by way of discussing a number of issues in methodology.

The reader of this volume will have to make a few adjustments to his or her favorite ways of thinking about "research." First, it is assumed here by the editors (and also by a number of the contributors) that the term research has a wider meaning than is usually implied in present-day empiricistic psychology. Namely, "research" includes in itself interdependence of researchers' activities through all levels--from the metatheoretical to the theoretical realms, and further from there to the construction of methods in accordance with the phenomena and the theoretical assumptions. We insist on the use of the old-fashioned term methodology in the sense of general principles of data construction (given the phenomena of interest, and the researcher's the-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.