Population Problems

Population Problems

Population Problems

Population Problems

Excerpt

A group of biological units belonging to the human species forms the raw material for society. But such a group does not form a society, as distinguished from an animal herd or an unsocialized throng, unless it has learned to carry on a set of activities which are maintained by virtue of the causal interrelations between the different members of the group. It is such a set of interrelated activities, impossible to have been evolved or to be maintained by individuals in isolation, that constitutes the life of society, and the most essential manifestation of social reality. Such activities, include languages, sentiments, beliefs, usages, customs, and institutionalized practices of every sort.

A society, or social group, may not be a population but, like the Socialists or the Roman Catholic Church, may be scattered abroad among the nations, yet truly united by virtue of the activities (opinions, sentiments, and overt practices) that its members have in common, and especially by virtue of the causal relationship between the activities of each and the activities of other members of the group. Every observable unit, social or physical, is made a unit by the interrelation of its parts, and spatial relations are not the only ones that can bind parts into a whole, nor are they the essential bond of a social unit.

But while a social group may not be a population, that is its members may not be in spatial proximity, yet that is the condition most favorable to the development and maintenance of a society. And while a mere population, that is a collection of biological units of the human . . .

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