Economy without Walls: Managing Local Development in a Restructuring World

Economy without Walls: Managing Local Development in a Restructuring World

Economy without Walls: Managing Local Development in a Restructuring World

Economy without Walls: Managing Local Development in a Restructuring World

Synopsis

Recent years have witnessed a revolution in the way economies work. The world has moved away from centralized governments and economies, toward decentralized governments and market-driven economies. A pragmatic, non-ideological approach to mixed economic systems is becoming the order of the day, blurring the lines between public and private, and referred to here as the "economy without walls." The purpose of Hamlin and Lyons' new work is to synthesize an understanding of the economy without walls, distill the implications of this economy for local communities, and apply knowledge of those implications to guiding communities' development. The book assumes that the use of intersectoral partnerships is an important part of any urban or regional development strategy. It systematically describes such partnerships, including the philosophical foundations of this approach and the financial and non-financial activities used to implement it. The work then discusses trends in the theory and practice of local community management that result from this economic restructuring. The implications of the "economy without walls" cannot be ignored if urban planners and related professionals are to be effective in the new worldwide environment. This book will be a must-read for scholars, students, and practitioners in urban planning, economic development, and public administration.

Excerpt

In 1991 the City Planning Institute of Japan memorialized its fortieth anniversary and sponsored "Tokyo Seminar '91: Public-Private Partnerships in Urban Development." the seminar aimed at analyzing and evaluating public-private partnerships in urban development during the 1980s from the international perspective.

The concept of public-private partnership in urban development originated in the United States in the late seventies to create a new mechanism of action to resolve serious and diversified socioeconomic problems in urban areas. the success of this new type of collaboration among individuals and organizations in the public and private sectors in the United States has stimulated actors in the urban development field in other nations, including Japan. the concept has been implemented and has materialized in various forms in the several nations discussed in this book. To underscore the usefulness and popularity of the concept in the international urban development field, speakers from the United Kingdom, France, and the United States contributed to the 1991 seminar and the succeeding workshop.

As a speaker at the Tokyo seminar, I spoke about two past research projects on this subject. One was sponsored by Japan's Housing and Urban Development Corporation (HUDC) in 1985, and the other was a joint research project conducted by Michigan State University and hudc in 1988 and 1989, in which the authors of this book participated and played key roles.

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