Arms Control and European Security

Arms Control and European Security

Arms Control and European Security

Arms Control and European Security

Synopsis

In October 1987 on the eve of the Washington summit, the Committee on Atlantic Studies, a group of European and North American scholars established in 1964 to promote transatlantic dialogue, met in Toronto to discuss the implications of the new arms control for European security. This book is the fruit of that meeting. Incorporating subsequent developments, up to Gorbachev's December 1988 speech to the U.N., it provides a timely assessment of arms control issues from a variety of European and North American perspectives.

Excerpt

Robert J. Jackson

The Committee on Atlantic Studies was established in 1964 to promote transatlantic dialogue on important international issues. Since that time it has grown and regularly reaches well beyond its immediate membership, involving politicians, scholars, students, and the general public in informed debate on important foreign affairs and defense questions.

This volume reflects the stimulating and sometimes controversial discussions that took place among members and guests of the Committee on Atlantic Studies at their annual meeting in October 1987. On the eve of the Washington Summit, scholars from both sides of the Atlantic gathered on the campus of Trinity College in Toronto, Canada, for a series of private and public meetings to discuss the implications of the "new" arms control for European security. This resulting volume--in which the authors have had the opportunity to "update" their earlier conference contributions, taking into account subsequent arms-control developments and the 1988 U.S. presidential election--provides a timely assessment of arms-control issues from a variety of European and North American perspectives.

Arms control has arrived at a significant crossroads, not only with respect to East-West accord but also in terms of its implications for the transatlantic relationship between the United States and its European allies. The Soviet Union and the United States have agreed to a treaty eliminating intermediate-range and short-range ballistic missiles, and . . .

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