Stalking, Harassment, and Murder in the Workplace: Guidelines for Protection and Prevention

Stalking, Harassment, and Murder in the Workplace: Guidelines for Protection and Prevention

Stalking, Harassment, and Murder in the Workplace: Guidelines for Protection and Prevention

Stalking, Harassment, and Murder in the Workplace: Guidelines for Protection and Prevention

Synopsis

Researched and written by two specialists in human resource management and workplace law, respectively here is sensible, practical advice on how to recognize, understand, cope with, and prevent a major and still growing crime in today's organizations. Their "red flag" indicators that a stalking crime is being committed, plus detailed analyses of the literature, court cases, and accounts by victims themselves, are specially designed and presented to help organizational managers create and implement successful anti-stalking and anti-harassment programs in their organizations. Schell and Lanteigne's narrative case studies make clear how victims act and react, and provide insight into the minds of stalkers. An important contribution to our understanding of a growing, extremely dangerous "happening," and an essential resource for executives and managers who have to cope with it.

Excerpt

Intent on empirically validating the notion that the stalker is one of the business and organizational curses of the 1990sand one that will follow us into the new millenniumwe set out to assess the prevalence of the stalking crime in organizations in North America, the United Kingdom, and Australia. But before we got too far into our global study, which began in the summer of 1998, we found that, even in Canada, where antistalking legislation has existed since 1993, few human resource (HR) managers could tell us how many stalking cases they had encountered in their organizations over the past decade. Even more disturbing was the fact that many HR managers, when asked, confused the crime that we were measuringstalking or criminal harassment (as it is known in Canada)with sexual harassment (highlighted by the U.S. case of Anita Hill).

Because of this unexpected response from HR managers, we put our plans for an international survey on hold and decided to turn our energies, instead, to educating businesses and organizations about the crime of stalking. To this end, we wrote a piece entitled "It's a Jungle in Here," which appeared in Canadian Business magazine in October 1998. Following its release, we received phone calls and email messages from employers and organizational members across Canada who said that although they could finally label their workplace plight as stalking and were glad that they were not alone in their predicaments, they were at . . .

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