Experiential Education for Community Development

Experiential Education for Community Development

Experiential Education for Community Development

Experiential Education for Community Development

Synopsis

These 20 essays illustrate teaching strategies that can be incorporated into community-based practicums and internships. The book explores the innovative uses of experiential education in community work. Useful techniques for community problem-solving and ways in which groups can learn to work together more effectively are provided. There are new applications of democratic practice. Mutual self-respect and collective self-reliance are encouraged. Practitioners will find they can have power in an increasingly interdependent society and world.

Excerpt

This book is the third in a series of volumes of curriculum essays on the concepts, issues, and strategies of community development education and training. The series was conceived in the mid-1970s by the Education Committee of the Community Development Society and was based initially on the findings of a 1973 survey by the late Dr. Harry L. Naylor, then a member of the faculty of the Department of Regional and Community Affairs at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

Naylor had collected and analyzed information about twenty-nine community development or closely related academic programs in the United States and Canada and had identified six teaching components common to nearly all of them: an introduction to the profession; courses on the theories and processes of small groups, societal change, community development, and community research; and a community-based practicum or field internship (Naylor, 1974:9-10). The Education Committee sponsored the preparation of a series of collections of essays, each collection focusing on one of these curricular components, to illustrate what academic institutions were teaching in the emerging new discipline of Community Development and to provide teachers and practitioners with reference materials in this and related fields.

The first two volumes--Curriculum Essays on Professional Education in Community Development, and Community Development Research: Concepts, Issues and Strategies--were edited by Dr. Edward J. Blakely (1975; 1979), currently professor of city and regional planning at the University of California, Berkeley. This third volume, on experiential education, includes twenty original essays and broadly illustrates teaching strategies that can be incorporated into community-based practicums and internships.

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