Measurement of Love and Intimate Relations: Theories, Scales, and Applications for Love Development, Maintenance, and Dissolution

Measurement of Love and Intimate Relations: Theories, Scales, and Applications for Love Development, Maintenance, and Dissolution

Measurement of Love and Intimate Relations: Theories, Scales, and Applications for Love Development, Maintenance, and Dissolution

Measurement of Love and Intimate Relations: Theories, Scales, and Applications for Love Development, Maintenance, and Dissolution

Synopsis

This is the most comprehensive state-of-the-art work on the measurement of love. It includes descriptions of a theoretical paradigm and two love models, a common mythological framework for theory development and evaluation, an introduction to over 40 theories for love development, maintenance, and dissolution, the integration of research principles and strategies, the compilation of 26 popularly used scales, and illustrations of three empirical research programs in measuring love and intimate relations. This book complements Tzeng's most recent work, Theories of Love Development, Maintenance, and Dissolution.

Excerpt

This book on the measurement of love is the sequel to my Theories of Love Development, Maintenance, and Dissolution: Octagonal Cycle and Differential Perspectives (Praeger 1992). Initially, the contents of both volumes were planned for a single-volume publication. The first draft, however, consisted of 19 contributed chapters and over 850 pages of manuscript, not including over 80 pages of references, figures, and tables. It was then decided to publish two volumes, distinctly dividing the scientific approach to love between its theories and its measurement.

The present volume represents the interim report of the compilation, evaluation, and summary of existing measurements of love behaviors. As stated in the preface to the first volume, love research has long been my personal interest, since I was first enthralled, at age 14, by the beautiful poems and passages in the famous Chinese novel The Dream of the Red Chamber; the measurement of love has been an intellectual challenge since I was a first- year graduate student in the United States.

In the spring of 1968, as a new graduate student at the University of Wisconsin-Stout, I began working as an assistant to clinical psychologist Hunter B. Shirley in his psychovector research laboratory. For the first time in my life, I was formally introduced to the various psychological meanings of love and their dynamics. We spent the following summer collecting pictures of human facial expressions and sorting them according to the 12 basic emotions of Shirley's Psychovector Model of Human Emotions. (Shirley defines love as a composite feeling of four approach emotions: pride, desire, affection, and curiosity. See Chapter 8 of this volume.)

Although Shirley was articulate in explaining his work, many doubted the validity of his model, as well as its reliability and utility for clinical purposes. Without a measurement scale, Shirley had had difficulty collecting and demonstrating empirical evidence for his model. My inability to assist him intensified my frustration with the elusive meanings of love described in The Dream of the Red Chamber. It was then that I resolved to address the measurement properties of the model and to clarify its utility.

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