The Fall of the U.S. Consumer Electronics Industry: An American Trade Tragedy

The Fall of the U.S. Consumer Electronics Industry: An American Trade Tragedy

The Fall of the U.S. Consumer Electronics Industry: An American Trade Tragedy

The Fall of the U.S. Consumer Electronics Industry: An American Trade Tragedy

Synopsis

This work traces the history and background of the once great American consumer electronics manufacturing industry, an industry that was plagued and finally destroyed by an American-Japanese cartel subverting enforcement of our traditional trade laws. The work is not a "Japan-bashing" diatribe, but a call for changes in Washington, and a return to free trade in our domestic and foreign commerce.

Excerpt

This is an inside history of the once-great pioneer consumer electronics industry in America. It is told in the context of the decades-long battles waged by Zenith Electronics Corporation, a leading independent pioneer in the industry, against a powerful international conspiracy that once monopolized worldwide radio--and later television--manufacture. Ultimately, one of the formidable American architects of this early trade conspiracy, David Sarnoff of rca (Radio Corporation of America), would, for generous license fees, facilitate the complete capture of the American television manufacturing industry by cartelized Japanese companies. This twenty-year operation was the first of many highly successful Japanese mercantilistic programs in the United States.

The story begins in the American industrial past with the notorious "trusts" that locked up markets and ruthlessly extorted the American public in the later part of the nineteenth century and early 1900s. the great "robber barons" were finally brought under some semblance of control by America's pioneering antitrust laws, just as the age of electricity and radio began. the emerging technology-based industries provided new opportunity for the so-called robber barons intent on evading or avoiding the antitrust laws.

The key patents of electricity and radio were bought up and combined into patent pools, which were used to crush competition in the new electrical industries. America's first large multinationals--General Electric (GE), Westinghouse, and American Telephone & Telegraph Co. (AT&T)--prospered wildly with almost complete monopolies in . . .

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