Career Decision Making

Career Decision Making

Career Decision Making

Career Decision Making

Synopsis

Keeping up with new developments in vocational psychology is important to both psychological practitioners and researchers. This volume is devoted to presenting and evaluating important advances in the field of career decision making, development, and maturity. More specifically, it identifies, reports, and evaluates significant contemporary developments in vocational psychology and provides both professional workers and students with an informed understanding of the progress taking place in the field. The history and theory of the assessment of career development and decison making are explored as well as advances in career planning systems. An expanded context for the study and evaluation of career development variables is also described.

Excerpt

Theories and research concerning career choice and career development have historically played a central and established role in the specialty of counseling psychology. Similarly, the concept of career indecision has occupied a central position in the theoretical and empirical literatures on career choice and development (Crites, 1969; Osipow, 1983). In light of the apparent importance of career indecision it seems surprising that until approximately 10 years ago the assessment of career decision making was characterized by either neglect or what, at least in retrospect, appear to be extremely simplistic approaches to its conceptualization and measurement. Little interest was shown until very recently in the actual process of decision making. Instead, the early focus was on career indecision. The research that was done usually classified subjects, who were most frequently college students, as either decided or undecided about their career choices or college majors. Occasionally other terms were used or the possibility of being tentatively decided was raised, but for the most part, subjects were classified as either decided or undecided.

Two questions about career indecision were dominant in the early research. The first question asked what percentage of college students were undecided. Although estimates vary widely across different samples using different measures, estimates of 20-30% seem representative (Astin, 1977; Crites, 1969; Lunneborg, 1975). Gordon (1984) suggested that these estimates may be conservative because they were based on only those who were willing to identify themselves as undecided. The estimates, whether conservative or not, do provide a clear substantive basis for concluding that career indecision is a common . . .

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