Woman as Mediatrix: Essays on Nineteenth-Century European Women Writers - Vol. 10

Woman as Mediatrix: Essays on Nineteenth-Century European Women Writers - Vol. 10

Woman as Mediatrix: Essays on Nineteenth-Century European Women Writers - Vol. 10

Woman as Mediatrix: Essays on Nineteenth-Century European Women Writers - Vol. 10

Synopsis

Introduction by Germaine Bree The Nineteenth Century: Insights of Contemporary Women Writers (Bettina Von Arnim, Mary Wollstonecraft, Flora Tristan) by Marie Claire Hoock-Demarle Woman as Mediatrix: From Jean-Jacques Rousseau to Germaine de Stael by Madelyn Gutwirth Mme de Stael and the Position of Women in France, England and Germany by Eve Sourian Corinne and the "Yankee Corinna": Mme de Stael and Margaret Fuller by Paula Blanchard George Sand's View of the English by Patricia Thompson Trollope's Choice: Frances Trollope Reads George Sand by Marie-Jacque Hoog George Sand and Marionettes by Julia Frey Musset's Lorenzaccio: George Sand's Ultimate Gift by Alex Szooyi Frederika Bremer: Sweden's First Feminist by Doris Asmundsson An Introduction to the Life and Times of Louise Otto by Ruth Ellen Boetcher Joeres Annette Van Droste-Bulshoff and Critics of "Die Judenbuche" by Maruta Lietina-Ray Towards a New Freedom: Rachel Varhagen and the German Women Writers Before 1848 by Doris Starr Guilloton A Nigilistka and a Communarde: Two Voices of the Nineteenth Century Russian Intelligentka by Isabelle Naginski Juliette Adam: She Devil or Grande Francaise? by Jean Scammon Hyland and Daniel H. Thomas About the Contributors

Excerpt

Germaine Brée

For several years now, Hofstra University's Cultural Center has successfully organized and hosted a series of conferences on topics Germane to the intellectual climate of our time. One of these conferences was the widely attended November, 1980, Conference on Nineteenth- Century Women Writers. It drew participants not only from colleges and universities throughout the United States but also from France and England. in 1980 women's studies had been developing vigorously, and Hofstra was one of its active centers with, among other contributions, its strong sponsorship of George Sand studies. the 1980 conference was thus able to program some fifty papers by established scholars, most of them women. the present volume contains a selection of fifteen of these papers, chosen with great care to give it a coherent framework, hence the absence of the great English novelists--Austen, the Brontës and George Eliot--and of Emily Dickinson, who were not absent from the conference program and are represented in a companion volume (Rhoda Nathan, ed., Nineteenth-Century Women Writers of the English-Speaking World, Greenwood Press, 1986).

It takes much thought on the part of an editor to draw such a frame from the papers themselves, where none had been pre-imposed. There are a few papers that are, as it were, self-contained, whose tie to the others is merely that they refer to a nineteenth-century woman writer; they offer solid contributions to literary history: Julia Frey's well-documented account of the puppet theatre at Nohant, Alex Szogyi's sensitive presentation of Sand's role in the creation of the best of Mus-

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