New England's Prospect

New England's Prospect

New England's Prospect

New England's Prospect

Excerpt

Seventeenth-century England craved news of America. As British outposts sprouted along the Atlantic seaboard--at Jamestown, Plymouth, Massachusetts Bay, Maryland--Englishmen read avidly the reports sent home by explorers and colonists. Some of the literature about America was intentionally inaccurate, and much of it was unintentionally misleading, but as the quantity mounted a few items of superior quality emerged. From those careful writings the English public gradually acquired a realistic sense of what America was and what it might become. By the end of the 1620s readers knew from several publications about the great tribulations and even greater potential of early Virginia and Plymouth; in the early 1630s English attention shifted to Massachusetts Bay where thousands of colonists, largely inspired by Puritan theology, had begun a remarkable new experiment in overseas colonization. Almost everyone, whether friend or foe of the experiment, or merely curious onlooker, awaited the reports that brought news and advice. But until 1634 there was no single book to which prospective colonists and others could turn for reliable information about England's latest American venture.

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.