American Nonsinging Games

American Nonsinging Games

American Nonsinging Games

American Nonsinging Games

Excerpt

I am convinced that games are as old as the human race. Play is actually inseparably bound up with the human mind. It belongs to the sunny side of our souls, having as its closest relatives poetry and art. In his stimulating and scholarly book, Homo Ludens (Man at Play), Huizinga calls games the most important driving force behind the growth of culture.

As soon as we have satisfied our first hunger after our birth, we begin playing; and we are still playing when, old and white-haired, we potter with our hobbies. Play is second nature for us. To practice it is to give expression to a deep- rooted human need. The urge to play is a sign of health, both of body and of soul. If a child does not play, we become worried about him. The muscles of the growing body need exercise and training, and the opportunity for both is afforded by the playground, with its facilities for climbing, running, jumping, lifting, balancing, etc.

The playing of games has long filled an important place in programs of physical education. In many countries it has been made a regular part of the school curriculum. It has had this status in Sweden, in both the lower and the higher schools, for more than a quarter of a century.

However, play gives to the young a great deal more than...

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