Ideas, People and Peace

Ideas, People and Peace

Ideas, People and Peace

Ideas, People and Peace

Excerpt

Great and explosive changes would now be under way in Asia, Africa and Latin America even though the Soviet Union did not exist. But because the Soviet Union does exist, because its strength is increasingly formidable and because its stated objective is a Communist world, it is essential that we consider its approach. Since the death of Stalin this approach has been drastically revamped.

The new Soviet leaders made peace in Korea, accepted an armistice in Indochina, a neutral, non-Communist Austria and discussed coexistence with President Eisenhower at Geneva.

Then armed with new techniques they abruptly turned toward the continents which Lenin believed held the key to world power: to the courting, in other words, of the impoverished, colored, largely peasant peoples of Asia, Africa and Latin America.

The dream of a world dominated from Moscow did not, however, originate with Lenin; its roots are deep in Russian history. In the nineteenth century the Pan-Slavist Fyodor Tyutchev wrote: "The three holy capitals of the Russian Empire are Moscow, St. Petersburg and Constantinople. But where are her boundaries in the North and East, in the South and West? Destiny will show that the path of the future will lead us to the seven seas and to the eight great rivers from the Nile to the Neva, from the Elbe to the . . .

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