Organic Adaptation to Environment

Organic Adaptation to Environment

Organic Adaptation to Environment

Organic Adaptation to Environment

Excerpt

Thomson and Geddes have said that "Every creature is a bundle of adaptations. Indeed, when we take away the adaptations, what have we left?" And it can not be denied that there is and must be an exceedingly intimate relationship between any plant or animal and its environment. Adaptability means life for the species as well as for the individual; the absence of it, death. Adaptation may even go so far that certain more or less defenseless organisms exhibiting the coloration and external character of other forms, are better able to care for themselves in the struggle for existence. The influence of the environment may affect the form, habits, size, and mode of reproduction of a species, as well as its external coloration and its physical structure.

It was with a view to obtain exact data on the problem of Organic Adaptation, that a symposium was proposed to consider the subject from the standpoint of biological and geological evidence, a combination novel in attacking this subject. As a consequence the following series of lectures was delivered before the Paleontology Club of Yale University during the academic year 1922-1923.

In order to understand the meaning of the term environment, it is first necessary to know just what comprises the complex series of conditions which surround both plants and animals. Professor Nichols' paper is, therefore, given over to a consideration of the environment itself in its broadest aspects, discussing the different agencies determining its character and outlining the effect of various individual conditions upon the organisms, using plant forms primarily to illustrate the results of environmental conditions.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.