Gentrification, Displacement, and Neighborhood Revitalization

Gentrification, Displacement, and Neighborhood Revitalization

Gentrification, Displacement, and Neighborhood Revitalization

Gentrification, Displacement, and Neighborhood Revitalization

Synopsis

Bringing an empirical, objective approach to a topic that has often been the source of emotional and uninformed controversy, Gentrification, Displacement and Neighborhood Revitalization provides an introduction to major issues in urban revitalization, new research findings, and a discussion of theoretical perspectives.

This is the first broad-based survey of a scattered literature that has not been readily accessible. The book's comprehensive introduction leads to informative analyses of new research by sociologists, planners, geographers, and urban studies faculty. A concluding essay examines the present state of knowledge about gentrification and discusses its implications, suggesting future developments and trends."

Excerpt

This volume is divided into four sections: (1) Issues and Perspectives in Neighborhood Renovation, (2) Recent Research Findings on Gentrification, Incumbent Upgrading, and Displacement, (3) Comparative Cross-National Patterns, and (4) Concluding Remarks. The papers comprising part 1 provide an introduction to major issues in urban revitalization and an overview of salient theoretical perspectives. Chapters 2 and 3 elaborate several of the themes developed in the editor's introductory chapter, especially the various theoretical frameworks that are explicitly or implicitly used by researchers in interpreting their data. Irving L. Allen's discussion, "The Ideology of Dense Neighborhood Redevelopment," in chapter 2, is essentially sociocultural in its treatment of the ideologies undergirding neighborhood redevelopment. By contrast, Smith andLeFaivre's "Class Analysis of Gentrification," in chapter 3, provides a Marxian or political-economic analysis of aspects of the revitalization movement. It is also instructive to note that each of these chapters contains some information relevant to the proposed "social movements" interpretation of gentrification: chapter 1 discusses some of the demographic underpinnings of the movement. Allen focuses on ideologies that motivate the behavior of the cohort involved, and Smith and LeFaivre emphasize both the role of elites with land-based interests in promoting the movement and the conflictive, intergroup power relations involved in competition over the increasingly scarce resource of inner-city space.

Part 2 contains six articles describing empirical research projects in a variety of cities. DeGiovanni (chap. 4) measures some of the costs and benefits of revitalization in twelve neighborhoods in six cities. Baldassare (chap. 5) provides an overview of the extent of neighborhood revitalization in a strangely neglected site: New York City. In a rare panel study, Spain andLaska (chap. 6) re-examine the attitudes of renovators in New Orleans two years after their initial . . .

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